Trends that will Impact the Future Automobile

 

The pandemic discourages the use of shared mobility and consumers demand that their vehicles have new integrated connected services, but they are not very willing to pay for them. This may impact the future of the sector, according to a study by PwC, which also analyzes how key issues such as connectivity, autonomy or the energy they consume will evolve.

A study by PwC suggests that the autonomous car is further away today than before the pandemic, as its drastic impact on sales and production in the sector, which will have consequences on the made investments. According to the Digital Auto Report 2020, this type of car will be a reality beyond 2035, although they will circulate on that date, but will not reach 1%.

In this study, PwC makes an analysis of how the four major axes that are shaping the future of the automobile will evolve between now and 2035.

On the one hand, connectivity, which will be boosted by regulatory requirements in the European Union and the United States. In the EU it is expected that in 2025 the fleet of fully connected vehicles will exceed 50%, in the USA this level is expected to be reached in 2023 and in China, however, it will take until 2029.

On the other hand, autonomy. At this point, the document highlights that autonomous driving will evolve with a wide range of use cases, but will still be marginal. In 2035, the percentage of vehicles in the second most advanced phase of autonomy will be 14% in the EU and 15% in China.

With regard to shared mobility, the report concludes that the situation generated by the pandemic and the drop in investments in autonomous vehicles will slow down the transition to new mobility models.

Finally, with regard to the evolution towards electric cars, the EU and China are the markets that are leading this transformation. In 2025, the share of new battery electric cars (BEV) in these geographic areas is expected to be 17% and 19%, respectively. The US, on the other hand, will barely reach 5% due to the lack of incentives from the US authorities.

The study also includes consumer opinion, which can be an anticipation of trends. In this sense, the pandemic discourages the use of shared mobility and consumers demand that their vehicles have new integrated connected services, but they are not very willing to pay for them.

In addition, it’s noted that the hybrid car is gaining popularity and that autonomous driving generates excitement. Consumers expect to have autonomous vehicles in the early 2030s, first in the field of transportation and later in the private vehicle. In fact, 66% of those interviewed would use autonomous vehicles and 75% declare willing to pay a ‘premium’ rate, between 2% and 5% additional to the normal price of the journey.